Literature

Our research is based largely on the published literature referenced here:

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– Eysenck MW. (1982). Attention and arousal. In: Cognition and performance. Berlin: Springer-Verlag.

Kleitman, N. (1982). Basic rest-activity cycle—22 years later. Journal of Sleep Research & Sleep Medicine. 5(4): 311-317

– Klein, R. & Armitage,  R. (1979). Rhythms in human performance: 1 1/2-hour oscillations in cognitive style. Science. 204(4399): 1326-1328. [DOI:10.1126/science.451541]

– Mackworth, N. H. (1948).The breakdown of vigilance during prolonged visual search. The Quarterly Journal Of Experimental Psychology. [DOI: 10.1080/17470214808416738]

– Mackworth, J.F. (1969). Vigilance and Habituation. Baltimore MD: Penguin

-Okawa, M., Matousek, M., Petersen, I. (1984) Spontaneous vigilance fluctuations in the daytime. Psychophysiology. 21: 207-211.

– Parasuraman, R., Nestor, P., & Greenwood, P. (1989). Sustained-attention capacity in young and older adults. Psychology and Aging, 4(3), 339-345.

– Pattyn, N., Neyt, X., Henderickx, D., & Soetens, E. (2008). Psychophysiological investigation of vigilance decrement: Boredom or cognitive fatigue?. Physiology & Behavior. 93(1): 369-378.

– Rasmussen, D. D. (1986). Physiological interactions of the basic rest – activity cycle of the brain: Pulsatile luteinizing hormone secretion as a model. Psychoneuroendocrinology. 11(4): 389-405. [DOI: 10.1016/0306-4530(86)90001-6]

– Tomporowski, P. D. & Tinsley, V. F. (1996). Effects of Memory Demand and Motivation on Sustained Attention in Young and Older Adults. The American Journal of Psychology. 109(2): 187-204

– Tsuji, Y. Kobayashi, T. (1988). Short and long ultradian EEG components in daytime arousal. Electroenceph. Clin. Neurophysiol. 70: 110-117.

– Whittenburg, J. A., Ross, S., & Andrews, T. G. (1956). Sustained perceptual efficiency as measured by the Mackwoth “Clock” Test. Perceptual and Motor Skills. 6: 109-116. [DOI: 10.2466/pms.1956.6.3.109]

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–  Angel, L. A., Polzella, D. J., & Elvers, G. C. (2010) Background music and cognitive

performance. Perceptual and Motor Skills. 110: 1059-1064. (Abstract)

– Banbury, S., Berry, D. C.(1997). Habituation and dishabituation to speech and office noise. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied. 3(3): 181-195. (Abstract)

– Bodner, E., Gilboa, A., Amir, D. (2007). The unexpected side-effects of dissonance.  Psychology of Music. 35(2): 286-305. (abstract)

– Furnham, A., & Bradley, A. (1997). Music while you work: The differential distraction of background music on the cognitive test performance of introverts and extraverts. Applied Cognitive Psychology. 11(5): 445-455.

– Huang, R.-H., & Shih, Y.-N. (2011). Effects of background music on concentration of workers. Work Reading Mass. 38(4): 383–387. (Abstract).

– Lesiuk, T. (2005). The effect of music listening on work performance. Psychology of Music. 33(2): 173-191. (pdf)

– Liptak, V., & Egger, J. (1981). Subjective and objective effects of music use during mental effort. Wiener medizinische Wochenschrift (1946). 131(9): 219. (Abstract)

– Mehta, R., Zhu, R. (J.), & Cheema, A. (2012). Is Noise Always Bad? Exploring the Effects of Ambient Noise on Creative Cognition. Journal of Consumer Research. 39(4): 784-799. (Paper)

– Perham, N., Vizard, J. (2011). Can preference for background music mediate the irrelevant sound effect?. Applied Cognitive Psychology. 25(4): 1099-0720. [DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acp.1731]

– Shih, Y. N., Huang, R. H., & Chiang, H. Y. (2012) Background music: effects on attention performance. Work. 42(4):573-8.

– Banbury, S., Berry, D. C. (1997). Habituation and dishabituation to speech and office noise. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied. 3(3): 181-195. (Abstract)

– Mackworth, N. H. (1948).The breakdown of vigilance during prolonged visual search. The Quarterly Journal Of Experimental Psychology. [DOI: 10.1080/17470214808416738]

– Ainley, M., Enger, L., & Kennedy, G. (2008). The elusive experience of ‘flow’: Qualitative and quantitative indicators. International Journal of Educational Research. 47(2): 109-121. (Abstract)

– Baumann, N., & Scheffer, D. (2011). Seeking flow in the achievement domain: The achievement flow motive behind flow experience. Motivation and Emotion,35(3), 267-284.

– Csikszentmihalyi, M. (1988). The flow experience and its significance for human psychology. In I. S. Csikszentmihalyi & M. Csikszentmihalyi (Eds.), Optimal experience: Psychological studies of flow in consciousness (pp. 15–35). Cambridge University Press. (book preview)

– Csikszentmihalyi, M., & Larson, R. (1987). Validity and reliability of the experience sampling method. Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease. 175: 529-536.

– Csikszentmihalyi, M., & LeFevre, J. (1989). Optimal experience in work and leisure. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. 56: 815-822.

– Jackson, S., & Csikszentmihalyi, M. (2005). Four Keys to Flow. Personal Excellence. 10(3): 9. (abstract)

– Mauri, M., Cipresso, P., Balgera, A., Villamira, M., & Riva, G. (2011). Why is Facebook so successful? Psychophysiological measures describe a core flow state while using Facebook. CyberPsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking. 14(12): 723-731.

– Vlachopoulos, S. P., Karageorghis, C. I., & Terry, P. C. (2000). Hierarchical confirmatory factor analysis of the Flow State Scale in exercise. Journal of Sports Sciences. 18(10): 815-823

– Weber, R., Tamborini, R., Westcott‐Baker, A., & Kantor, B. (2009). Theorizing flow and media enjoyment as cognitive synchronization of attentional and reward networks. Communication Theory. 19(4): 397-422.

– Csikszentmihalyi, M., & Larson, R. (1987). Validity and reliability of the experience sampling method. Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease. 175: 529-536.

– Vlachopoulos, S. P., Karageorghis, C. I., & Terry, P. C. (2000). Hierarchical confirmatory factor analysis of the Flow State Scale in exercise. Journal of Sports Sciences. 18(10): 815-823

– Weber, R., Tamborini, R., Westcott‐Baker, A., & Kantor, B. (2009). Theorizing flow and media enjoyment as cognitive synchronization of attentional and reward networks. Communication Theory. 19(4): 397-422.

–  Eldar, E., Ganor, O., Admon, R., Bleich, A., & Hendler, T. (2007). Feeling the Real World: Limbic Response to Music Depends on Related Content. Cereb. Cortex. 17 (12): 2828-2840. [DOI: 10.1093/cercor/bhm011]

– Vijayalakshmi, K., Sridhar, S., & Khanwani, P. (2010). Estimation of effects of alpha music on EEG components by time and frequency domain analysis. Computer and Communication Engineering ICCCE 2010 International Conference. [DOI: 10.1109/ICCCE.2010.5556761]

– Aston-Jones, G., Gonzalez, M., & Doran, S. (2007). Role of the locus coeruleus-norepinephrine system in arousal and circadian regulation of the sleep–wake cycle. In: Ordway, G. A., Schwartz, M. A., & Frazer, A. (Eds.) . Brain Norepinephrine. Cambridge Books Online. Cambridge University Press. [DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511544156.007] (pdf)

– Aston-Jones, G., Rajkowski, J., & Cohen, J. (1999). Role of locus coeruleus in attention and behavioral flexibility. Biological psychiatry. 46(9): 1309-1320. (pdf)

– Blood, A. J., Zatorre, R. J., Bermudez, P., & Evans, A. C. (1999). Emotional responses to pleasant and unpleasant music correlate with activity in paralimbic brain regions. Nature Neuroscience. 2(4): 382–387. (Abstract)

– Brattico, E., Alluri, V., Bogert, B., Jacobsen, T., Vartiainen, N., Nieminen, S., & Tervaniemi, M. (2011). A Functional MRI Study of Happy and Sad Emotions in Music with and without Lyrics. Frontiers in Psychology. 2(12): 308. [DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2011.00308]

– Brown, S., Martinez, M. J., & Parsons, L. M. (2004). Passive music listening spontaneously engages limbic and paralimbic systems. NeuroReport. 15(13): 2033–2037. (Abstract)

– Coull, J. T. (1998).Neural correlates of attention and arousal: Insights from electrophysiology, functional neuroimaging and psychopharmacology. Progress in neurobiology. 55(4): 343–361. [DOI:10.1016/S0301-0082(98)00011-2]

– Curio, G., Neuloh, G., Numminen, J., Jousmäki, V. & Hari, R. (2000). Speaking modifies voice-evoked activity in the human auditory cortex. Human Brain Mapping. 9(4): 83–191. [DOI:10.1002/(SICI)1097-0193(200004)9:4<183::AID-HBM1>3.0.CO;2-Z]

– Green, A. C., Baerentsen, K. B., Stødkilde-Jørgensen, H., Wallentin, M., Roepstorff, A., & Vuust, P. (2008). Music in minor activates limbic structures: a relationship with dissonance? NeuroReport. 19(7): 711–715. (Abstract)

– James, C. E., Britz, J., Vuilleumier, P., Hauert, C.-A., & Michel, C. M. (2008). Early neuronal responses in right limbic structures mediate harmony incongruity processing in musical experts. NeuroImage. 42(4): 1597–1608. (Abstract)

– Mair, R. D., Zhang, Y., Bailey, K. R., Toupin, M. M., & Mair, R. G. (2005). Effects of clonidine in the locus coeruleus on prefrontal-and hippocampal-dependent measures of attention and memory in the rat. Psychopharmacology.181(2): 280-288.

– Menon, V., & Levitin, D. J. (2005). The rewards of music listening: response and physiological connectivity of the mesolimbic system. NeuroImage. 28(1): 175–184. (Abstract)

– Pantev, C., Hoke, M., Lehnertz, K., Lütkenhöner, B., Anogianakis, G., & Wittkowski, W. (1988). Tonotopic organization of the human auditory cortex revealed by transient auditory evoked magnetic fields. Electroencephalography and clinical neurophysiology. 69(2): 160–170. [DOI:10.1016/0013-4694(88)90211-8]

– Rajkowski, J., Kubiak, P., & Aston-Jones, G. (1994). Locus coeruleus activity in monkey: phasic and tonic changes are associated with altered vigilance. Brain Research Bulletin. 35(5-6): 607-616. (Abstract)

– Robertson, I.H. & O’Connell, R. (2010). Vigilant Attention. In: Kia Nobre, Jennifer Theresa Coull, Attention and Time. Oxford. Oxford University Press. (book preview)

– Sara, S. J., & Bouret, S. (2012). Orienting and Reorienting: The Locus Coeruleus Mediates Cognition through Arousal. Neuron. 76(1): 130-141.

– Berridge, C. W. (2008). Noradrenergic modulation of arousal. Brain Res Rev. 58(1):1-17.

– Blood, A. J., Zatorre, R. J., Bermudez, P., & Evans, A. C. (1999). Emotional responses to pleasant and unpleasant music correlate with activity in paralimbic brain regions. Nature Neuroscience. 2(4): 382–387. (Abstract)

– Coull, J. T. (1998).Neural correlates of attention and arousal: Insights from electrophysiology, functional neuroimaging and psychopharmacology. Progress in neurobiology. 55(4): 343–361. [DOI:10.1016/S0301-0082(98)00011-2]

– Dalton, B. H. (2006). The effects of sound types and volumes on simulated driving performance, simple vigilance and heart rate. ProQuest Dissertations and Theses. Memorial University of Newfoundland (Canada). (Abstract)

– Donchin, E., Coles, M.G.H. (1988). Is the P300 compnent a manifestation of context updating?. Brain Behav. Sci. 11: 357-374.

– Hansenne, M. (2000). The P300 event-related potential. II. Interindividual variability and clinical application in psychopathology. Clinl Neurophysiol. 30(4): 211-231.

– Makinen, V., May, P., & Tiitinen, H. (2004). Transient brain responses predict the temporal dynamics of sound detection in humans. NeuroImage. 21(2): 701-706.

– Sarter, M., Givens, B., Bruno, J. P. (2001). The cognitive neuroscience of sustained attention: where top-down meets bottom-up. Brain Research Reviews. 35(2): 146-160. [DOI: 10.1016/S0165-0173(01)00044-3] (pdf)

– Parasuraman, R., & Beatty, J. (1980). Brain events underlying detection and recognition of weak sensory signals. Science. 210(4465): 80–83. (Abstract)

– Polich, J. (1997). On the relationship between EEG and P300: individual differences, aging, and ultradian rhythms. International Journal of Psychophysiology. 26(1–3): 299-317.

– Angel, L. A., Polzella, D. J., & Elvers, G. C. (2010) Background music and cognitive performance. Perceptual and Motor Skills. 110: 1059-1064. (Abstract)

– Ariga, A., & Lleras, A. (2011). Brief and rare mental “breaks” keep you focused: Deactivation and reactivation of task goals preempt vigilance decrements. Cognition. 118(3): 439-443. (Abstract)

– Helton, W. S., & Russell, P. N. (2012). Brief mental breaks and content-free cues may not keep you focused. Experimental Brain Research. 219(1):37-46. (Abstract)

– Lavie, N., Hirst, A., de Fockert, J. W., & Viding, E. (2004). Load theory of selective attention and cognitive control. Journal of Experimental Psychology. 133(3): 339–54.

– Cherry, E. C. (1953). Some experiments on the recognition of speech, with one and two ears. Journal of the Acoustic Society of America. 25:975-979.

– Banbury, S., Berry, D. C. (1997). Habituation and dishabituation to speech and office noise. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied. 3(3): 181-195.

– Blakeslee, P. (1979). Attention and vigilance: performance and skin conductance response changes. Psychophysiology. 16(5): 413-419. [DOI: 10.1111/j.1469-8986.1979.tb01494.x]

– Matthews G, Warm JS, Reinerman-Jones LE, Langheim LK, Washburn DA, Tripp L. (2010). Task engagement, cerebral blood flow velocity, and diagnostic monitoring for sustained attention. J Exp Psychol Appl. 16(2):187-203. [DOI: 10.1037/a0019572] (paper)

– Oken,  B.S., Salinsky, M.C., & Elsas, S.M. (2006). Vigilance, alertness, or sustained attention: physiological basis and measurement. Clin Neurophysiol. 117(9): 1885–1901. [DOI:  10.1016/j.clinph.2006.01.017]

– Patterson, T., & Venables, P. H. (1980). Auditory vigilance: normals compared to chronic schizophrenic subgroups defined by skin conductance variables. Psychiatry Research. 2(1): 107-112.

– Röer, J. P., Bell, R., Dentale, S., & Buchner, A. (2011). The role of habituation and attentional orienting in the disruption of short-term memory performance. Memory cognition. 39(5): 839-850. (Abstract) (pdf)

– Warm, J. S., Matthews, G., & Parasuraman, R. (2009). Cerebral Hemodynamics and Vigilance Performance. Military Psychology. 21(1): S75 — S100. [DOI: 10.1080/08995600802554706] (pdf)

– Oldham, G. R., Cummings, A., Mischel, L., Schmidtke, J., & Zhou, J. (1995). Listen While You Work? Quasi-Experimental Relations Between Personal-Stereo Headset Use and Employee Work Responses. Journal of Applied Psychology. 80(5): 547-564. (Abstract)

– Barkley, R. A. (1997). Behavioral inhibition, sustained attention, and executive functions: Constructing a unifying theory of ADHD. Psychological Bulletin. 121(1):65-94. (pdf)

– Van Mourik, R., Oosterlaan, J., Heslenfeld, D. J., Konig, C. E., & Sergeant, J. A. (2007). When distraction is not distracting: a behavioral and ERP study on distraction in ADHD. Clinical Neurophysiology. 118(8): 1855–1865. (Abstract)

– Brown, S., Martinez, M. J., & Parsons, L. M. (2004). Passive music listening spontaneously engages limbic and paralimbic systems. NeuroReport. 15(13): 2033–2037. (Abstract)

– Chapin, H., Jantzen, K., Scott Kelso, J. A., Steinberg, F., & Large, E. (2010). Dynamic Emotional and Neural Responses to Music Depend on Performance Expression and Listener Experience. (A. Rodriguez-Fornells, Ed.). PLoS ONE. 5(12): 14. (Abstract) (Paper)

– Chartrand, J.-P., Filion-Bilodeau, S., & Belin, P. (2007). Brain response to birdsongs in bird experts. NeuroReport. 18(4): 335–340. (Abstract)

– James, C. E., Britz, J., Vuilleumier, P., Hauert, C.-A., & Michel, C. M. (2008). Early neuronal responses in right limbic structures mediate harmony incongruity processing in musical experts. NeuroImage. 42(4): 1597–1608. (Abstract)

– Sutherland, M. E., Grewe, O., Egermann, H., Nagel, F., Kopiez, R., & Altenmüller, E. (2009). The influence of social situations on music listening. Annals Of The New York Academy Of Sciences. 1169: 363–367. (Abstract)

– Parasuraman, R., & Hancock, P. A. (2004). Neuroergonomics – Harnessing the power of brain science for human factors and ergonomics. Bulletin of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, December 2.

– Parasuraman, R. (2011). Neuroergonomics: Brain, Cognition, and Performance at Work. Current Directions in Psychological Science. 20(3): 181–186. [DOI: 10.1177/0963721411409176] (pdf)

– Parasuraman, R. (2005). Neuroergonomics: An overview of research and applications. Foundations of Augmented Cognition. 11: 839–840.